Linux Mauritius

RALEIGH, N.C. – January 7, 2014 – Red Hat, Inc, (NYSE: RHT), the world’s leading provider of open source solutions, and the CentOS Project today announced they are joining forces to build a new CentOS, capable of driving forward development and adoption of next-generation open source technologies.

This collaboration strengthens Red Hat’s proven business model by extending the Red Hat open source development ecosystem. Red Hat anticipates that taking a role as a catalyst within the CentOS community will enable it to accelerate development of enterprise-grade subscription solutions for customers and partners, such as Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform, Red Hat Cloud Infrastructure, Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, Red Hat JBoss Middleware, OpenShift by Red Hat, and Red Hat Storage.

Ten years ago, Red Hat formed the Fedora Project to deliver advanced, state-of-the-art features for Linux. Just as a traditional operating system relies on the hardware beneath it, so too do projects such as cloud, virtualization, and Software-Defined Networking (SDN) rely on the foundation of an operating system. Fast development pace and openness to change make Fedora an excellent place for operating system innovations and related projects. Today, by taking an active role in the CentOS Project, Red Hat is once again extending its leadership in open source innovation by helping to establish a platform well-suited to the needs of open source developers that integrate technologies in and around the operating system.

With today’s announcement, Red Hat extends its commitment to rapid open source technology and solution development to deliver:

  • Commercial development and deployment: Red Hat Enterprise Linux, the world’s leading enterprise Linux platform, offering an extensive ecosystem of partners, a comprehensive portfolio of certified hardware and software offerings, and Red Hat’s award winning support, consulting, and training services. Red Hat subscriptions deliver this value combined with access to the industry’s most extensive ecosystem of partners, customers, and Linux experts to support and accelerate success.
  • Community integration beyond the operating system: CentOS, a community-supported and produced Linux distribution that draws on Red Hat Enterprise Linux and other open source technologies to provide a platform that’s open to variation. CentOS provides a base for community adoption and integration of open source cloud, storage, network, and infrastructure technologies on a Red Hat-based platform.
  • Operating system innovation across the stack: Fedora, a community-supported and produced Linux distribution that makes it easy for users to consume and contribute to leading-edge open source technologies from the kernel to the cloud. As a cutting edge development platform where every level of the stack is open to revision and improvement, Fedora will continue to serve as the upstream project on which future Red Hat Enterprise Linux releases are based.

Since its initial release in 2004, the CentOS Project has grown to include a significant amount of focus on open source technology integration and a sizable user community. Red Hat and the CentOS Project recognize an opportunity to begin a new era by collaborating to expand the CentOS Project to address innovation, community contribution, and participation up the stack and beyond the operating system. By joining forces with the CentOS Project, Red Hat aims to accelerate community innovation, engagement, and momentum around open source cloud and infrastructure projects.

Red Hat will contribute its resources and expertise in building thriving open source communities to the new CentOS Project to help establish more open project governance and a roadmap, broaden opportunities for participation, open pathways for contribution, and provide new ways for CentOS users and contributors to bring the power of open source innovation to all areas of the software stack. With Red Hat’s contributions and investment, the CentOS Project will be able to expand and accelerate, serving the needs of community members who require different or faster-moving components layered on top of CentOS, expanding on existing efforts to collaborate with open source projects such as OpenStack, RDO, Gluster, OpenShift Origin, and oVirt.

Misha - SBL 20

SnowBird Linux 20 (Misha)

SnowBird Labs is pleased to announce the release of SnowBird Linux 20 (“Misha”) based on Fedora 20 (“Heisenbug”). This release coincides with the 10th anniversary of the creation of the Fedora Project, Xmas and first anniversary of SnowBird Labs, so it calls for a triple celebration.

SnowBird Linux 20 is built on top of the Linux 3.11 kernel, sports the Gnome 3.10 desktop and an improved Network Manager. Gnome 3.10 brings quite a few new features, applications and a significant visual refreshing change to the desktop. The first noticeable change is the new look of the windows. Gnome 3.10 features a new “Header Bar”, which collapses a window’s title bar and toolbar into a single element, saving a bit of vertical screen space and giving Gnome windows a slightly less cluttered look.

These visual refreshes are felt throughout Gnome 3.10, but nowhere as noticeable as in the file browser, Nautilus which looks slick and clutter free. Perhaps the best visual tweak in Gnome 3.10 is the new system menu that, like so much of the Gnome interface, is designed to be clean and simple, staying out of the way until needed. Most of the Gnome Shell indicators and applets like Wi-Fi, Blue-tooth, Volume, Battery, Brightness have been condensed into a single drop-down menu that’s hidden away until you click the system menu icon in the upper right corner.

SnowBird Linux 20 features the tweaks and customization you would expect to find in a modern desktop. We have bundled a new theme along with the much loved Faenza icon set, true type fonts, the increasingly popular LibreOffice suite, audio and video codecs, full burning support, telephone and social applications, the most popular browsers including Firefox and it’s add-ons, productivity and graphics software, development tools and the small utilities that simplify our life, enhanced hardware support along with the latest and greatest repositories pre-configured.

It will take a while before all the mirrors are in sync for downloads, so have a merry Xmas while looking forward to lay your hands on this awesome release.

Greetings!

We can say with great certainty the Fedora Project is pleased to announce the release of Fedora 20 (“Heisenbug”), which coincides with the 10th anniversary of the creation of the Fedora Project.

Download this leading-edge, free and open source operating system now: http://fedoraproject.org/get-fedora

Detailed information about this release can be seen in the release notes: http://docs.fedoraproject.org/en-US/Fedora/20/html/Release_Notes/index.html

*** Dedicated to Seth Vidal ***

On July 8, the Fedora Project lost Seth Vidal, a dedicated, tireless, and brilliant contributor. Seth was a lead developer of Yum and the Fedora update repository system. He worked to ensure that the technical and community infrastructure of Fedora worked well and consistently for users and contributors around the world. Seth touched the lives of hundreds of Fedora contributors directly and millions of others indirectly by improving the experience of using and updating Fedora.

The Fedora Project dedicates the Fedora 20 release to Seth and asks that you join us in remembering his generous spirit and incredible work that helped make Fedora what it is today. We miss you, Seth.

*** 10 Years of Fedora ***

The Fedora 20 release coincides with Fedora’s tenth anniversary. The first Fedora release (then called Fedora Core 1) came out on November 6, 2003. The Fedora Project community has grown into an active and vibrant one that produces a new version of this leading-edge, free and open source operating system around every six months.

*** Desktop Environments and Spins ***

The Fedora Project strives to provide the best desktop experiences possible for users, from desktop environment to application selection. We also produce  nearly a dozen spins tailor-made for desktop users, hardware design, gaming, musicians, artists, and early classroom environments.

Spins are available for download here: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/20/Spins

== GNOME 3.10 ==

Fedora 20 comes with GNOME 3.10, which has several new applications and features that will please GNOME-lovers. This release includes a new music application (gnome-music), a new maps application (gnome-maps), a revamp for the system status menu, and Zimbra support in Evolution.

== KDE Plasma Workspaces 4.11 ==

The Fedora KDE SIG has rebased to KDE 4.11 for Fedora 20. This release includes faster Nepomuk indexing, improvements to Kontact, KScreen integration in KWin, Metalink/HTTP support for KGet, and much more.

== Spins ==

Spins are alternate versions of Fedora.  In addition to various desktop environments for Fedora, spins are also available as tailored environments for various types of users via hand-picked application sets or customizations.

See all of the Fedora 20 Release Spins here: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/20/Spins

*** ARM as a Primary Architecture ***

While Fedora has supported a number of hardware architectures over the years, x86/x86_64 has been the default for the majority of Fedora users and for the Linux community in general.

ARM, however, has been making massive strides. It already dominates the mobile market, is becoming a go-to platform for hobbyists and makers, and is showing enormous promise for the server market as well.

In keeping with Fedora’s commitment to innovation, the Fedora community has been pushing to make ARM a primary architecture to satisfy the needs of users and developers targeting the ARM platform.

*** Cloud and Virtualization Improvements ***

The Fedora 20 release continues the Fedora tradition of adopting and integrating leading edge technologies used in cloud computing. This release includes features that will make working with virtualization and cloud computing much easier.

== First-Class Cloud Images ==

The Fedora Cloud SIG has been working hard to provide images that are well-suited for running as guests in public and private clouds like Amazon Web Services (AWS) and OpenStack.

If you’re using public or private cloud, you should grab one of the downloadable Cloud Images or find a supported EC2 image, here:

http://fedoraproject.org/en/get-fedora-options#clouds

== VM Snapshot UI with virt-manager ==

Taking VM snapshots is now much easier. Though qemu and libvirt have all the major pieces in place for performing safe VM snapshots/checkpoints, there isn’t any simple, discoverable UI. This feature will track adding that UI to virt-manager and any other virt stack bits that need to be fixed/improved, including adding functionality to libvirt to support deleting and rebasing to external snapshots.

== ARM on x86 with libvirt/virt-manager ==

You can now run ARM VMs on x86 hosts using standard libvirt tools: libvirt virsh, virt-manager and virt-install.

*** Big Data ***

The Fedora 20 release includes all the packages you need to run Apache Hadoop 2.2.0. Hadoop is a widely used, increasingly complete big data platform with a strong, growing community and ecosystem. The Hadoop packages included with Fedora 20 will provide a foundation for immediate use of Hadoop and a base for the rest of the Apache Hadoop ecosystem.

*** Developer Goodness ***

As always, Fedora 20 includes new features and updated packages that will be of interest to all manner of developers.

== WildFly 8 ==

WildFly 8 is the next version of the application server previously known as JBoss Application Server. With WildFly 8, it’s possible to run your Java EE 7 applications with unparalleled speed.

WildFly 8 boasts a optimized boot process that starts services concurrently to eliminate unnecessary waits and taps into the power of multi-core processors. At the same time, WildFly takes an aggressive approach to memory management and keeps its memory footprint exceptionally small compared to other JVMs.

== Ruby on Rails 4.0 ==

This update supports Ruby on Rails developers by providing system-packaged Ruby on Rails of the latest version. Apart from that, Rails 4.0 also brings improved functionality, speed, security, and better modularization.

*** Maturity and Advanced Features ***

Sometimes it’s not the big, new features that make a user’s experience better; it’s the little enhancements or long-awaited tricky features that really help make a new release the bee’s knees.

== NetworkManager Improvements ==

NetworkManager is getting several improvements in Fedora 20 that will be welcome additions for power users and system administrators.

Users will now be able to add, edit, delete, activate, and de-activate network connections via the nmcli command line tool, which will make life much easier for non-desktop uses of Fedora.

NetworkManager is also getting support for bonding interfaces and bridging interfaces. Bonding and bridging are used in many enterprise setups and are necessary for virtualization and fail-over scenarios.

== No Default Sendmail, Syslog ==

In the interests of paring down services that are generally not used on desktop systems, Fedora 20 removes and replaces some services that many users find unnecessary from the Live Desktop DVD. They will remain available as installable packages for users who might need them.

The systemd journal now takes the place as the default logging solution for minimal and other selected installation methods, such as the Live Desktop DVD, having been tested and able to manage persistent logging in place of syslog.

Also, Sendmail will no longer be installed by default, as most Fedora installs have no need of a Mail Transfer Agent (MTA).

*** Even More Changes ***

Fedora prides itself on bringing cutting-edge technologies to users of open source software around the world, and this release continues that tradition. No matter what you do, Fedora 20 has the tools you need to help you get things done.

A complete list with details of each new change is available here: https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Releases/20/ChangeSet

*** Documentation ***

Read the full release notes for Fedora 20, guides for several languages, and learn about known bugs and how to report new ones:

http://docs.fedoraproject.org/

Fedora 20 common bugs are documented here: http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Common_F20_bugs

This page includes information on several known non-blocker bugs in Fedora 20; please be sure to read it before installing!

*** Contributing ***

We hope that you’re excited to have Fedora 20 in your hands and are looking forward to using it and exploring its new features and many improvements over Fedora 19. But that’s not all! Fedora never stands still, we’re always working towards a new and better release and sharing our work with the world. Want to be part of the fun? It’s easy to get involved!

There are many ways to contribute to Fedora, even if it’s just bug reporting. You can also help translate software and content, test and give feedback on software updates, write and edit documentation, design and do artwork, help with all sorts of promotional activities, and package free software for use by millions of Fedora users worldwide.

To get started, visit http://join.fedoraproject.org today!

Cheers,

-robyn

[Fedora Project Leader]

Thu Dec 12 20:42:14 UTC 2013

At the Fedora 20 Final Go/No-Go Meeting that just occurred, it was agreed to Go with the Fedora 20 by Fedora QA and Fedora Development. Fedora Release Engineering to be notified.

“#agreed Fedora QA and Fedora Development are both Go; Fedora Release Engineering to be notified (with possibility to revisit Go decision in case of unexpected issues from releng side)”

Fedora 20 will be publicly available on Tuesday, December 17, 2013. I’d like to use this opportunity to say big “thank you” to everyone involved in the release of the Heisenbug and for catching all heisenbugs we hit during Fedora 20 cycle!

download-374x242

I decided to upgrade my Zabbix instance to 2.2 as the upgrade process is supposed to be easier since the database upgrade is performed by the server. Grabbed and installed the latest zabbix-release rpm, fired up yum update and to my surprise no updates :( .. It had to be done manually, so I did a rpm -qa | grep zabbix and downloaded the matching updates. This time it worked when running yum localinstall *.rpm , so that had to be it. Pointed my browser to the Zabbix url and that’s when disaster struck ” Database error: The frontend does not match the Zabbix database” A quick look at the server log revealed that the database upgrade failed since it’s trying to drop an inexistent column (lastvalue) from the items table.  Let’s make the database upgrade script happy by creating the missing column (as it will drop it in any case) and restart the server.

mysql -u root -p

use zabbix;

ALTER TABLE items ADD lastvalue VARCHAR(60);

Restart the Zabbix server using service zabbix-server restart and watch the Zabbix server log, the database upgrade process will be shown and once complete you can login again to your instance. Hope this saves someone some frustration.

I always start with a minimal install when provisioning new systems which are usually deployed through Spacewalk but there are some instances where I have no deployment server, so after a DVD install I have a broken XForwarding which is quite easy to fix.

yum install xorg-x11-xauth xorg-x11-fonts*

It’s quite handy when scripted within a kickstart file, which is why I don’t always remember it :) so documenting it on the blog keeps it accessible. You don’t need to plug in all the fonts but if you work with legacy applications or Oracle, you’ll want to have them on the system.

If you’ve played a lot with putty and need a remote session management tool, have a look at PAC Manager @ techmint.com

acaleechurn:

Spacewalk gets a modern look

Originally posted on Tilting at windmills:

Spacewalk is SUSE Manager upstream project. We base our product on Spacewalk’s codebase and contribute features and fixes back.

Screenshot from 2013-10-30 09:42:09

There are lot of advantages of working in a mature codebase. At the same time, you get to work everyday with legacy code.

We want SUSE Manager to look great and behave like a modern web application. We want it to survive a rapidly changing environment that gives you new challenges like mobile. Our main goals were:

  • Better mobile responsiveness
  • A standard and documented CSS framework as a base
  • Easier customization of the CSS (e.g. LESS)
  • Deprecate the Prototype library and use JQuery
  • Nicer icons

The topic was first discussed as “what could we do” in order to keep everything current and relevant. Then we presented a quick prototype migrating the user interface to something based on Twitter Bootstrap. This is what the prototype looked like:

Image

The idea…

View original 255 more words

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